Anonymous asked:

Hey ! (sorry, I'm a total noob on tumblr so I don't know if there's any way to comment on a blog entry) Just wanted to say, your entry about the situation Quebec is totally great, thank you for it and I hope it'll make some Canadians open their eyes about us, but I noticed a HUGE mistake at the end of it ! "or the giant media conglomerate Quebecor, which is in the pocket of the PLQ" Quebecor is owned by a candidate, now deputee, of the PQ, not PLQ, which makes kind of a big difference. ;)

The post in question was written long before this was the case, just preceding the Québec general election which the PQ won in 2012. That doesn’t mean I wasn’t wrong, but I also think the situation was much more ambiguous back then.

That post seems to be making the rounds again, but I think people don’t realize how long ago it was written.

retromantique
fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Hesperornis was a large bird, reaching up to 6 feet (1.8 m) in length. It had virtually no wings, and swam with its powerful hind legs.
© The Field Museum, Z84076.
Hesperornis, model of the extinct flightless aquatic bird. Progress, for Hall 21 exhibit case. 
5x7 negative.
2/3/1948 

It looks like a slug with a beak and two twigs stuck to its butt.

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Hesperornis was a large bird, reaching up to 6 feet (1.8 m) in length. It had virtually no wings, and swam with its powerful hind legs.

© The Field Museum, Z84076.

Hesperornis, model of the extinct flightless aquatic bird. Progress, for Hall 21 exhibit case.

5x7 negative.

2/3/1948 

It looks like a slug with a beak and two twigs stuck to its butt.

maxistentialist

maxistentialist:

The Globe and Mail:

For every $1 spent providing housing and support for a homeless person with severe mental illness, $2.17 in savings are reaped because they spend less time in hospital, in prison and in shelters.

[…]

Usually, homeless people do not get housing and services such as rehab until they meet certain criteria like sobriety or taking medications, and people have little choice on where they can live.

The Housing First philosophy holds that getting a person a place to live is primordial because it creates the stability to tackle issues such as addiction, unemployment and lack of education.

[…]

Providing housing and support is costly too – an average of $19,582 per person. But the avoided costs are much greater, $42,536 on average, because those who are housed are put in hospital less often, make fewer ER visits and do not use shelters as often.

This seems like the exactly the kind of sensible and effective policy that we will never be able to implement in America because conservatives will say, “If you give homeless people homes, they’ll have no incentive to avoid homelessness.”